SHELTER

October  2004

Publisher's Notes

 

Thanks to Building Codes

Building codes—why do we need them? Well, it is very simple if you take a look 
at what has been happening in the Southeast part of the country lately. First, Hurricane Charley, and then Hurricane Frances. 

As I sit here writing this, Hurricane Ivan is still out at sea but picking up more power each day. Currently, Ivan is a category four and heading in the direction of the Gulf of Mexico. Also, as I am writing this column, the effects of Hurricane Frances have made their way up to Pennsylvania with torrential downpours, and the rain is simply pounding down on the windows. We are expected to get a good amount of rain over the course of the day, which is going to leave us with flooding in areas, but hopefully dry houses when it’s finished. 

We’ll be the lucky ones in this part of the country. Unfortunately, the folks in Florida and other states in the Southeast haven’t been so lucky.

Mother Nature has a way of showing us who is boss and making us realize the products we utilize to build houses today must be kept up to the appropriate code. A hurricane here, a tornado there, tropical storms, torrential downpours, high winds, flooding, forest fires, etc, etc. The list could go on and on, but no matter what part of the country you are in and depending on where you are in the supply chain, there is a pretty good chance you have had to deal with the building codes. 

It might be during the manufacturing process that you have the painstaking process of keeping your products up to code. If you are in the sales channel, you have to make sure you are teaming up with the correct manufacturers and that they have their products up to code. If not, I am certain you have had or will have to deal with some legal issues at some point in your business career.

Keeping products up to code is certainly not easy, nor inexpensive. However, when you look at the destruction a hurricane can do, you quickly realize why you have to abide by the codes. 

One reporter covering the re-opening of Sanibel Island, Fla., after Charley summed it up very well. He said, “Yes, there was a bunch of destruction on the island, but for the most part the houses were still standing. The reason being was a whole lot of money, and the new building codes.”

Within the pages of this issue, you will see a variety of products being advertised. For distributors, you will get a chance to view many of these products in person at the AMD Convention in Salt Lake City.

The funny thing about the way we operate: Mother Nature comes along and knocks us down, but we pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off and turn around and build a bigger and better place to live. 
Make it a great day, Brian Welsh, publisher
bwelsh@sheltermagazine.com .


SHELTER

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