Volume 33, Number 5, May 1998

PEOPLE 2 WATCH - 5/98

For every challenge there is at least one person who rises to meet it successfully. Here's a look at some of the people USGlass believes have emerged as leaders into the next decade. We selected 40 "People to Watch" to be included in this section for the various challenges they are meeting (along with a number of "Young Turks" 40 or younger). Of those 40, all who responded to our questionnaire are included here. The answers and comments are all their own, save our editors' notes about "What to Watch for" in the coming year. Watch these guys:

Charles E. (Ed) Bayha

President, Zircon Corporation, Colliersville, TN
62, B.S. in Chemistry, Rutgers University; Ph.D., University of Vermont

Experience:
Eight years in glass/metal industry. Previously — Alpha Corporation. Hobbies: Tennis, chess, bowling and internet surfing.
Heroes:
Bill Gates— "innovative and successful"; Jimmy Stewart — "good actor with high integrity."
The Next Decade:
"Dramatic increase in growth."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Lack of vision; resistance to change."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Creating a viable business which I can hand over to someone who is capable."
What to Watch for:
Exemplary integration of technological innovation with rapid growth.
Tell Our Readers:
"I place a high premium on business integrity and the ability to be innovative."

Robert R. Birkhauser

President, Auto Glass Specialists, Inc., Madison, WI
45, B.A. in Psychology, University of Wisconsin

Experience:
24 years in glass industry.
Hobbies:
Golf, computers and travel.
Heroes:
Robert Goddard, Stephen Hawkins, Ray Kroc. "All had dreams, overcame obstacles and reached their goals."
The Next Decade:
"Consolidation for the near term, new full-line services including insurance/fleet claims management."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Being controlled/directed by others outside of our industry."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Lack of mutual cooperation within industry, low professional standards, poorly organized industry with poor vision."
What to Watch for:
The model for use in development of successful, regional auto glass replacement companies, complete with repair services, EDI, billing services and quality training.

James W. (Jim) Bradford, Jr.

President & CEO, AFG Industries, Inc., Kingsport, TN
50, B.A., University of Florida, 1969; J.D., Vanderbilt University School of Law, 1973; AMP, Harvard Business School, 1997

Experience:
14 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — private law practice.
Hobbies:
Golf, gardening, music and reading.
Heroes:
Winston Churchill and Anwar Sadat. "Churchill because of his leadership in WWII both of his country and the western alliance. Sadat for his vision and humility in beginning the process of establishing peace in the Middle East, despite those around him who favored status quo."
The Next Decade:
"The successful companies in the glass industry, automotive, architectural and speciality, will offer the consumer new products that offer real value from a comfort, aesthetic, energy conservation and quality of life viewpoint. While affordability will continue to play a very important role as the industry changes how it goes to market, I am convinced the consumer will invest in these value-added longer term savings."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Overcapacity and international competition may make the glass industry unworthy of investment."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Maintaining the entrepreneurial spirit of AFG while changing the culture from a start-up company to the second largest glass company (largest in the primary market served) has provided me personally with many challenges for the last six years. I look forward to continuing evolution of AFG and finding new ways to serve our customers as their best glass company in a highly competitive market."
What to Watch for:
Inventive new products that change the "glass as commodity" paradigm.
Tell Our Readers:
"Glass is the best of building materials. It appeals to consumers and provides real benefits to our quality of life. Despite this fact, few, if any, in our industry have truly appealed to the consumer. The industry typically uses ‘push through' rather than ‘pull through' approaches to the market. . ."

Robert "Bob" Cerrito

President, Cerrito Glass Distributors, Johnston, RI
54, B.S. in Business Administration, Bryant College

Experience:
24 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — automotive parts and recycling industry.
Hobbies:
Stock market, golfing, yachting and travel.
Heroes:
Lee Iacocca — "a visionary with excellent management skills." Donald Trump — "ability to bounce back." Arnold Palmer — "stability with fame and fortune."
The Next Decade:
"Continued growth due to the ever-expanding use of new glass and glass products."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The further development of plastics to replace glass in safety related applications — automotive and architectural."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Successful transition from the automotive industry to the glass industry and achieving growth, respect, and recognition by my peers."
What to Watch for:
A new regional metal supplier.
Tell Our Readers:
"Maintain dignity in business. ‘Business' is neither reason nor excuse to disregard another person's right to respect and self esteem."

Ron Brasier

President, Tempa Glass Industries Ltd., North Vancouver, BC, Canada
60, Mechanical Design Engineer, Production Management, Problem-solving

Experience:
14 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — troubleshooter to the manufacturing industries.
Hobbies:
Collecting and driving classic cars.
Heroes:
Sir John Harvey-Jones — ex-chairman of ICI Ltd. and troubleshooter with his own TV series.
The Next Decade:
"Residential: products will remain much the same . . . Commercial: architects and owners will demand more variety."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The markets will become oversupplied with equipment and glass products."
Biggest Challenge:
"Selling up everything in England and emigrating to Canada with a young family in 1968."
What to Watch for:
Model of expansion in a particular niche from regional to international.

William M. Cobb

President/CEO, Coastal Ind. Inc., Jacksonville, FL
60, University of South Carolina

Experience:
41 years solely in the glass/metal industry.
Hobbies:
Golf, boating, fishing, tennis and snow skiing.
Heroes:
Bill Gates, Andy Grove, Ronald Reagan — "innovators, entrepreneurs, visionaries."
The Next Decade:
"New innovations for product design and construction. Simplification of inventories. Vast improvements in installation efficiency. Prompt availability, customer field support."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Pricing deteriorates to commodity type levels."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Forming an organization from ground up with no operating capital or investment banking to $20 million plus in sales annually."
What to Watch for:
Lessons in how to meet the challenges when sales exceed capacity while still maintaining customer loyalty in an era of rapid growth.

Paul Gill

Vice President and General Manager, Glass Systems Division, Visteon Automotive Systems, Allen Park, MI
B.S. in Physics and Chemistry, University of Punjab, India; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Oklahoma State University; M.S. in Industrial Engineering, Wayne State University.

What to Watch for:
Ability to change corporate culture.

Russell Huffer

President/CEO, Apogee Enterprises, Minneapolis, MN
48, M.S., Troy State University; B.S., United States Air Force Academy

Experience:
19 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — U.S. Air Force, Ford Motor Co.
Hobbies:
Golf and family fun.
Heroes:
John Glenn.
The Next Decade:
"Solid growth, new ‘intelligent' products."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Lack of willingness to invest in industry quality and promotion of standards."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Personal growth."
What to Watch for:
How successful a turn-around Apogee can make.

Russell J. Ebeid

President-Glass Group, Guardian Industries Corp., Auburn Hills, MI
B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Kettering University; M.S. in industrial engineering, Wayne State University; registered professional engineer

Ebeid, left, with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl.

Experience:
28 years in the glass industry. Previously — General Motors Corp.
Hobbies:
Backgammon, sports and landscaping.
Heroes:
"Sister Paraclita, a high school teacher who taught me nontraditional methods of accomplishing goals with a positive disposition."
The Next Decade:
"A continuing trend to globalization with local execution as well as additional fragmentation because of niche competitors and/or a limit of vision and capabilities by non-competitive organizations. There will also be great opportunities for independent businesses who stay within the needs of their customer base."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The lack of attention to recruiting people who have the ability to think segmentally instead of the inherently flawed, broad-based market share approach as well as understand the limitations of vertical integration."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"To imbue the principles, philosophies, practices and independent business culture that have been responsible for our past successes to our multi-cultured, global organization geographically located at continuously greater distances."
What to Watch for:
Global strategic planning, management savvy.
Tell Our Readers:
"The business direction, practices, philosophies and approaches will be dominated by a culturally diverse group of global competitors which consist of Japanese, English, American and French who may have differing strategies, alliances and allegiances."

Stephen F. Kalosis

President, Pilkington-Building Products North America, Toledo, OH
53, B.S. in Aerospace Engineering, Naval Academy; MBA, Michigan State University

Experience:
12 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — Hughes Tool Co.
Hobbies:
Sport fishing.
Heroes:
Ronald Reagan for his leadership and Jack Welch for his business acumen.
The Next Decade:
"Energy performance requirements in new product development, custom service partnerships, industry consolidation and global challenges."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The ability to attract, train and develop the technical skills required for new technology development."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Combat flying in Vietnam."
What to Watch for:
New product development; maintaining growth while downsizing.
Tell Our Readers:
"People relationships with your family, company and customers are critical."

Rose Mackey

President, Glas-Weld Systems, Inc., Bend, OR
Accounting, Central Oregon College

Experience:
13 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — six years in insurance industry.
Hobbies:
Spending time with family, gardening and travel.
The Next Decade:
"More emphasis on certification and training of glass repair technicians. Even closer cooperation and support for glass repair from the insurance industry, and better education of the general public regarding the benefits of glass repair."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Keeping up with new technology and product developments that affect this industry."
What to Watch for:
Global expansion into new markets.

Barbara "Barb" Mulqueen

President, Western Glass Supply Inc., Denver, CO
39, B.S. in Marketing and Education, University of Northern Colorado

Experience:
15 years in the glass/metal industry.
Hobbies:
Biking, hiking and sewing.
Heroes:
"Grandmother because she was spunky, told it like it was and was ‘superwoman.'"
The Next Decade:
"Managers seeing actual high costs of labor and expecting more service from outside companies, such as contract help, suppliers and service businesses."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Working only 20 hours a week last year due to poor health."
What to Watch for:
Models of how to build successful relationships between product manufacturers and regional companies that distribute their products.

Stephen L. Oyer

President, Quality Glass Service, Inc., Goshen, IN
46, Organizational Management Program at Goshen College

Experience:
25 years in the glass/metal industry.
Hobbies:
Computers and bicycling.
Heroes:
"Jesus Christ because he was willing to sacrifice so others could succeed in life, both in this life and the next."
The Next Decade:
"More consolidations and mergers. Small independent glass shops that fail to make the transition to new methods and technologies will likely be acquired or fail."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Not enough small independent shops will make the changes needed to remain viable and the independents will lose numbers, strength and their voice."
What to Watch for:
Development of a regional powerhouse–one shop at a time.
Tell Our Readers:
"The next decade will be challenging, but smaller independent glass shops which are prepared, proficient and professional still have a lot to offer to the marketplace. Don't be weary of well-doing."

John Screnci

Executive Vice President, Glass Wholesalers, Inc., Houston, TX
47, St. Joseph's College

Experience:
21 years in glass/metal industry.
Hobbies:
Golfing and playing with grandson.
Heroes: Nick Screnci.
"My father immigrated from Italy at the age of ten, worked hard, ran a business and raised three children with only his work ethic."
The Next Decade:
"The industry needs to play catch-up to become proficient in the technological aspect of business."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The lack of young people entering our industry."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Raising two children to become responsible adults."
What to Watch for:
Marketing prowess.
Tell Our Readers:
"Change is coming, prepare for it."

Allan Skidmore

President & CEO, TCG International Inc., Speedy Auto Glass, Novus Inc., Burnaby, B.C. Canada; Mercer Island, WA
50, Business Administration, Langara College

Experience:
30 years in glass/metal industry.
Hobbies:
Fishing, golf and boating.
Heroes:
"Henry Ford and Sam Walton for working at what they believed in and keeping at it."
The Next Decade:
"More electronic communication and computerization in the industry."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Not adapting to change."
Biggest Challenge:
"Enhancing my computer skills."
What to Watch for:
Anything. No one really every knows what's coming next from this industry giant.
Tell Our Readers:
"Do not be afraid of change and listen to the ideas of the young men and women entering into our industry."

Richard C. Stephens

General Manager, Windsor Window Company-Division of Woodgrain Millwork, Monroe, NC
41, B.S. in Business Administration from Univ. of GA.

Experience:
20 years in the industry.
Hobbies:
Spending time with my wife and daughters.
Heroes:
Jimmy Hewell, founder of Peachtree Windows and Doors, who was a true role model.
The Next Decade:
"Continued demand for maintenance-free products or extremely low maintenance synthetic products. I also see the glass industry making great strides in extending the life span of an insulating unit."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The industry is still extremely volatile when it comes to trends in the housing market. Most window and door companies have enormous available capacity, causing competition to be fierce in flat building cycles. Increased pricing pressure tends to drive the quality of the product downward."
What to Watch for:
Research of consumer preferences and development of products dictated by such.
Tell Our Readers:
"Consumers are becoming more educated on window and glass products as evidenced by the need to discuss window ratings."

Bob Vogelzang

President, RV Marketing, Inc. dba DCM Company & V-Sales Company, Elkhart, IN
50, Associate of Business Administration, Glen Oaks Community College

Experience:
Ten years in glass/metal industry. Previously — six years vice president, Consolidated Marketing Services, Inc.; three years U.S. Navy.
Hobbies:
Golf, fishing and boating.
Heroes:
"Russell Kurtz, high school industrial arts teacher who taught me that there is never an acceptable substitute for doing it the right way."
The Next Decade:
"The industry can most certainly expect various forms of survival marketing programs at all levels followed by a maturity evolution in the marketplace. A review of other industries always shows an eventual rooting out of price-based programs leaving principle- and ethic-based programs to endure."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"My concern about alternative programs that have similarities to these programs just creates the potential of putting another fox in the same hen house to join in the hunt. Involving distributors in the billing and pricing process of the retailers is wrong and introducing alternative programs that are similar is also wrong. Multiple wrongs will never make it right."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"In 1985, starting DCM Company with $1,500 between my family and starvation."
What to Watch for:
A willingness to do what he believes is right and moral–even if it results in loss of business.
Tell Our Readers:
"I will always subscribe to the old fashioned ‘Smith-Barney' philosophy of acquiring and maintaining customers. We'll earn them."

Ken Werbowy

President and CEO, Tubelite Inc., Reed City, MI
42, B.E.Sc., MBA, University of Western Ontario

Experience:
Four years in glass/metal industry. Previously — Emco Ltd., Manville Corp.
Hobbies:
Running, weight-training, guitar.
Heroes: Jack Welch of GE:
"Ability to turn an ‘institution' into a growth engine. Stephen Covey, "Seven habits philosophy."
The Next Decade:
"Continued pressure to supply a high quality product at a competitive price. Suppliers will have to focus on productivity."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Our industry appears to be ‘market share' oriented vs. ‘profit' oriented. If this trend continues, industry profitability could be in jeopardy."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Initiating and continually energizing culture change — both within and outside the company."
What to Watch for:
Models for successful company turn-around and profit, rather than market, orientation.

Eye on Adhesives

The next decade will be an important one for mirror adhesive products, as environmental and performance concerns come to the forefront again. Three companies, and individuals, take front and center:

Robert J. Cline

National Sales Manager, Gunther Mirror Mastics, South Bend, IN
49, Degree in Ind. Technology, Ball State University.

Experience:
12 years as a supplier; with Gunther Mirror Mastics three years. Previously — ChemRex Inc., an adhesive and sealant manufacturer.
Hobbies:
Spending time with my family, sailing on the Great Lakes and playing golf.
Heroes:
James McQuinn (deceased) — sales manager for Coppes Kitchen. "He was role model, father figure, and friend. This person convinced me to get into sales. If I can be half the man he was, I will have accomplished all I could hope for."
The Next Decade:
"New technical advances in the way mirrors and adhesives are manufactured. Generally the market looks to remain constant with moderate growth in the next decade. More consolidation of companies to increase market share will be common place."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"[The lack of] a qualified and reliable labor force. Today there are so many independent contractors installing mirrors. Training these people is becoming a real issue."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Maintaining profitability and increasing market share is a challenge in this industry. Our efforts are more focused. We are investing in new equipment and expanding our product line to meet our customers' needs and grow our business."

Ken Hegyes

President, Capital Tape Co. and Glazers Choice, Cleveland, OH
55, B.A., Rutgers University; M.B.A., Weatherhead School of Case Western Reserve

Experience:
Seven years in the industry. Previously — Avery Dennison and Rexham Marketing.
Hobbies:
Fly-fishing, art and motorcycle riding.
Heroes:
In the glass industry: John O'Shaughnessy, Sr. of Marjon, Hialeah, FL — "A true professional of the glass industry." Hank Groves of Groves, Inc., McHenry, IL — "The most outstanding salesman I have ever met. He adds service to his customers because of his experience in the industry." Outside the glass industry: W.E. Deming and Bill Gates — "both used inherent genius to change the normal course of business."
The Next Decade:
"Continued materials evolution which will enhance the use of glass and mirror."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Overcapacity in some segments will lead to consolidations or failures."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Leaving my wife and ten month old son for my tour of duty in Vietnam."

S. W. Palmer-Ball

President, Palmer Products Corporation, Louisville, KY
67, Centre College, B.S. from UHK

Experience:
45 years in glass/metal industry. Previously — U.S. Army.
Hobbies:
Antique cars and trains.
Heroes:
L. B. Palmer-Ball, Sr. (father), " a self-made man dedicated to his family, highest integrity and business standards and his love of the USA."
The Next Decade:
"More concern about environmental issues. New standards in construction to meet changes of all kinds. World markets expanding."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Slowness in adopting the highest standards as they apply to manufacturing and craftsmanship."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Raising a family in a country that is suffering moral decay."

Young Turks

No More than 40 Years Old and Coming on Strong

Richard Campfield

President, Edgeguard Inc., Ultra Bond Inc., Ultra Bond Licensing Corp., Grand Junction, CO • Photo on Cover
40, B.S. in Management, East Stroudsburg University

Heroes:
Clint Eastwood — "judge, jury and executioner." John Walsh — "turned tragedy into triumph."
The Next Decade:
"Edgeguard will be a standard part of all windshields and repairs will outnumber replacements."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The independents will not change their marketing strategies in time to survive."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"My son's three-year battle with cancer and the loss of his sight."

Joseph Gold

Vice president, Gold Glass Group Corp., Bohemia, NY
29, B.S. in Finance and Management, New York University, Stern School of Business

Heroes:
"My father — he has shown me one can be successful without compromising his beliefs, passions, ethics or family."
The Next Decade:
"The OEM glass manufacturers will form an unspoken alliance with the independent auto glass companies. Without a competitive marketplace they will lose control of their ability to price glass."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Margins are so small that I worry we will not survive a nationwide economic downturn."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Staying focused while not taking it all too seriously."

Todd C. Joubert

Vice president sales and marketing, United States Aluminum, Waxahachie, TX • Photo on Cover
36, B.A., Southern Arkansas University

Heroes: Thomas Jefferson for his diverse life.
The Next Decade:
"More computerization; EDI between manufacturers and contractors; shorter lead times; generally a much faster industry."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Training and education of new people (or the lack of) in the industry."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Balancing career and family."

Joseph Karas

President, Karas & Karas Glass Co. Inc., South Boston, MA
40, B.S. in Business Administration, Uni. of Hartford

Heroes:
"Elia Karas and others like him who came to America at the turn of the century and had the drive and work ethic to build businesses that still thrive."
The Next Decade:
"I don't pretend to know the future, none of the predictions I made ten years ago came true. I do think the glass and glazing industry has flourished, and through innovation and hard work at every level, from the biggest float manufacturers to the Mom and Pop glass shops, will continue to thrive."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The erosion of profitability at all levels, due to ‘the lowest price' being confused with ‘the best overall value' based on quality and service."

Patrick J. Kenny

Marketing Manager., Window & Door, Flat Glass Products, PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA
40, B.S. in Management, Indiana University; EMBA, University of Pittsburgh

Heroes:
"Franklin D. Roosevelt, our greatest president this century, using courage, conviction, and compassion, he led our country through some of our darkest hours—the Great Depression and WWII."
The Next Decade:
"Intense competition, breakthrough product innovation, non-traditional channel alliances, and dramatic business restructuring through information technology advances."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Ability of industry to attract and retain talented younger people in the face of more ‘glamorous' industries."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"I have not faced any big challenges — only big opportunities for learning and personal improvement."

Michelle Magyar

President, Mid-American Auto Glass, Sales Manager, Mid-American Glass, Davenport, IA
32, B.S. in Business Administration, Univ. of Iowa

Heroes: Father Lou Magyar for teaching and dedication.
The Next Decade:
"Trends of getting bigger will subside, the demand of the consumer for quality goods and services will increase."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The industry is in danger of losing its leaders."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"Rebuilding after a fire destroyed my home."

Thomas R. Mills

President, Arcadia Architectural Products, Inc., Stamford, CT
36, City College of New York

Heroes:
"Bill Gates for his tenacious drive and perseverance to continually develop and market new products in spite of his position."
The Next Decade:
"A unified testing standard and specifications code, as well as a commitment by all reputable manufacturers to strive for excellence in customer relations and service."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"The absence of a uniform licensing and enforcement policy is inviting a large number of untrained and incompetent subcontractors to open shop and operate at the expense of our industry."
Biggest Personal Challenge:
"To find new ways to improve our existing products and bring to the market new and innovative features that will help make our products stand out from those of our competitors."

Leon Silverstein

C.O.O./Owner, Arch Aluminum & Glass, Inc., Tamarac, FL
37, B.S. in Communications, Northwestern University.

Heroes:
Andrew Carnegie — "He believed in hiring people that had an expertise, knowledge or ability that he didn't possess. These, he believed, were his keys to success."
The Next Decade:
"The continuing consolidation of the medium to large privately owned fabricator/distributor into large national companies. I also feel the small distributor/fabricator will remain viable as he specializes or has a niche in certain markets that the larger companies either ignore or can't service. Unfortunately, the medium-size company will become the next victim in a downturn."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"Its ability to make money. Market share and egos have replaced the priority of companies operating for profit-only motives."

A New Approach to Machinery Sales

Joseph and Urban Machinery have formed innovative partnerships and sales strategies designed to lead both into the next century. Team work is especially strong at both companies, as witnessed by the responses from some of them below.

David Pirwitz

Director of U.S. Operations, Urban Machinery, Inc., Tualatin, OR
31, B.S. in Production Operations Management and Finance, Ohio State University

Heroes:
"While Urban Machinery's success in North America has been built on the sweat of a whole team of individuals, our team's leader, Volker Lamprecht, embodies all that is hardworking, honest and fair. He treats each and every employee, customer and vendor as he himself would like to be treated, and that attitude has been contagious to all levels of our organization. Because I aspire to these values in my own every day dealings, Volker has been an invaluable role model."
The Next Decade:
" . . .window manufacturers will need to be dynamic, and assemble not only efficient operations, but ones that are flexible as well. Window and door products and the materials they're made from will probably change as much in the next five years as they have in the last ten, so flexibility will be critical."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"I hope the PVC fenestration industry continues a trend toward quality products. In the race to offer competitive windows and doors to the masses, it's tempting to cut corners in the names of efficiency and bottom line, but bad consumer experience is hurtful to all of us. "

Raymond Smith

Sales Manager, Joseph Machine Company, Inc., Dillsburg, PA
40, B.S., Jacksonville University

Heroes:
"My father was my role model and is still my hero. He taught me to treat everyone as I would be treated."
The Next Decade:
"A swift movement away from traditional, labor intensive manufacturing to a more automated factory with more educated workers."
Biggest Industry Fear:
"I fear smooth talking, greedy individuals will take advantage of less- experienced companies."
Biggest Challenge:
"Trying to educate people to new methods . . . and the challenge of change."
USG

Copyright 1998 Key Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any type without expressed written permission.