Volume 33, Number 12, December 1998

 

AGRSS-ive Standard Developed

ANSI AGR Standard

The Automotive Glass Replacement Safety Standards Committee (AGRSS), which has been working for more than a year to develop nationally-recognized automotive glass replacement safety standards, is close to meeting that goal. The first step toward that goal was reached in September when the committee received official accreditation from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as a Standard Development Committee.

The AGRSS committee recently completed development of the standard at committee level. The group tentatively voted to approve the third draft and formal ballots have recently been mailed. "Since we already had approval of the third draft, and we have effectively dealt with committee member concerns, we expect formal committee approval of the ballot," said Dean Mieske, of the Performance Achievement Group, and the AGRSS committee’s chair.

Once the draft is approved by committee, the standard will be sent to ANSI for approval. The ANSI process is made up of three steps: ANSI publishes the draft then ANSI provides a comment period and finally AGRSS responds to public comments. "We expect the ANSI process to go very well," said Mieske. "We’ve had an open process all along where we shared drafts with others in the industry, including those outside the committee and we’ve had a complete cross-section of industry interests."

Mieske said he expects ANSI to publish the standard in early 1999. According to Mieske, the AGRSS committee was formed when Carl Jolliff, owner of Jolliff Glass in Peoria, IL and president of the Independent Glass Association (IGA) approached the Performance Achievement Group to provide technical training to his staff and management. "After Carl pondered it he said, ‘wouldn’t it be great if the industry could develop its own standards,’" said Mieske.

Mieske credits Jolliff with assembling a diversified group to serve on the committee. Members include those from auto glass manufacturers, adhesive manufacturers, training companies, auto glass installation companies, educational organizations and others in the industry.

The committee’s proposed automotive glass replacement safety standards address procedures, education and product performance. Purposes of the group, as described in the final draft, are as follows:

Other sections of the draft include definitions, vehicle assessment before replacement, selection of glass and retention systems, installation standards—adhesive bonded, installation standards—rubber gasket, education and a safe drive-away time matrix.

Mieske said most of the standard was developed at a steady pace. However, one item of contention included setting benchmarks for safe drive-away time. "Up until the last meeting, this topic took the lion’s share of attention," said Mieske. "Eventually, we were able to work out a compromise."

Once ANSI publishes the draft it will notify the public in its ANSI Standards Action newsletter and will provide information about how to receive the standard on its website at www.ansi.org.


USG

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