Volume 47, Issue 3 - March 2012

feature

Top of the Ranks
An Inside Look at the Nation’s Top Glazing Contractors —and Their 2012 Outlook

The contract glazing industry is an ever-changing one and in today’s market the industry’s biggest players are, too. Even as USGlass compiled this very list of the top contract glaziers of 2011, we learned that one of these—ranked number 3 on the list—had closed up shop, even after reporting to USGlass as receiving $110 million in sales for last year less than a week before the closing (see the Rewind: A Look at the Lists of the Past paragraph below).

Today, federal and institutional work are currently at a high, while private commercial work remains somewhat stalled (see the Institutional, Federal Work Less Reliable for Glazing Contractors Seeking a Niche paragraph below).

In the following pages, you’ll find not only a look at the industry’s main players, but also several accompanying stories about working in today’s contract glazing environment, contract glaziers’ newest hopes and fears, and more.

Most information listed below was submitted by the glazing contractors listed; annual sales listed include volume for commercial work only and backlog change refers to the increases or decreases in reserved projects since last year. This is included only when provided by the company.

When not available, annual commercial sales were estimated by our staff.

1. Permasteelisa North America Corp.
Windsor, Conn.
2011 annual sales: $200 million+
President/CEO: Alberto de Gobbi
Number of employees: 1,000
Years in business: 23
http://www.permasteelisausa.com
Permasteelisa Group is a contractor in the engineering, project management, manufacturing and installation of architectural envelopes and interior systems.

2. Enclos Corp.
Eagan, Minn.
2011 annual sales: $152 million
President/CEO: Gregg Sage
Number of locations: 16
Number of employees: 200+
Years in business: 36
http://www.enclos.com
Enclos provides comprehensive design, engineering and strategic implementation services for custom facades and curtainwall cladding systems.

3. Trainor Glass Co.
Farmers Branch, Texas
2011 annual sales: $110 million
President/CEO: Brian Clark, Bob Trainor
Number of locations: 9
Number of employees: 400
Years in business: 59
http://www.trainorglass.com
Founded in 1953, Trainor Glass provided fabrication, design, engineering and installation of glass products and framing systems in a variety of architectural applications, including new construction, green building solutions, building rehabilitation, store fronts and entrances, tenant interiors, and custom specialty work. The long-standing industry leader closed its doors in February 2012 (see related story on page 10).

4. Walters & Wolf
Fremont, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $101 million
President/CEO: Randy Wolf
Number of locations: 5
Number of employees: 490
Years in business: 35
Backlog change: +32 percent
http://www.waltersandwolf.com
Walters & Wolf is a West Coast provider of cladding services. Founded by John Walters and Randy Wolf in 1977, company officials say they aim to take direct responsibility for every phase of a project, from concept to completion.

5. Harmon Inc.
Bloomington, Minn.
2011 annual sales: $98.1 million
President/CEO: Brad Austin
Number of locations: 11
Number of employees: 300
Years in business: 60+
http://www.harmoninc.com
Harmon Inc. works as a partner with owners, architects, consultants, contractors and suppliers to translate designs into functional exterior cladding solutions.

6. W & W Glass LLC
Nanuet, N.Y.
2011 annual sales: $95 million
Managing Partners: Michael Haber, Jeffrey Haber, Howard Haber and Scott Haber
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 150
Years in business: 35
http://www.wwglass.com
Backlog change: -5 percent
W & W Glass is a New York-based glazing subcontractors that specializes in unitized curtainwall, storefronts, interior glass and glazing. W & W is the North American distributor of the Pilkington Planar structural glass system.

7. CBO Glass Inc.
Alden, N.Y.
2011 annual sales: $68 million
President/CEO: Gilbert DiMaio
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 250
Years in business: 50
http://www.cboglass.com
CBO Glass began as a one-room operation in Buffalo, N.Y., and has become a full-service glazing contractor serving customers with two locations both locally and throughout the United States.

8. Architectural Glass & Aluminum Co. Inc.
Alameda, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $62.5 million
President/CEO: John Buckley
(president)
Number of locations: 4
Number of employees: 163
Years in business: 42
http://www.aga-ca.com
Architectural Glass & Aluminum (AGA) was founded in 1970 and established in the San Francisco Bay area. AGA has now expanded to become a major Pacific Rim company, with full-service offices in Alameda, Irvine, Sacramento and Honolulu.

9. Massey’s Plate Glass and Aluminum Inc.
Branford, Conn.
2011 annual sales: $51.2 million
President/CEO: Robert Massey Jr. (CEO), Laura Massey (president)
Number of locations: 3
Number of employees: 150
Years in business: 39
http://www.masseysglass.com
Backlog change: +30 percent
Since 1973, Massey’s Plate Glass and Aluminum Inc. has provided design assist consultation technical expertise, single-source efficiency, unitized wall systems and self-performed fabrications.

10. TSI/Exterior Wall Systems
Upper Marlboro, Md.
2011 annual sales: $44.8 million
President/CEO: Victor Cornellier
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 100
Years in business: 34
http://www.tsicorporations.com
Backlog change: +13 percent
TSI/Exterior Wall Systems Inc. (TSI) has completed major projects in the private and public sector, including landmark office buildings, hotels, sports facilities, hospitals and universities.

11. SPS Corp.
Apex, N.C.
2011 annual sales: $41.2 million
President/CEO: Michael J. Russo (owner), Christopher J. Craney (owner/CFO)
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 152
Years in business: 30
http://www.spscorporation.com
SPS Corp. is a full-service specialty contractor based in Apex, N.C.

12. Architectural Wall Systems Co.
West Des Moines, Iowa
2011 annual sales: $36 million
President/CEO: Mike Cunningham (CEO), Tom Schlotfeldt (president)
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 150
Years in business: 20
http://www.archwall.com
For twenty years, Architectural Wall Systems Co. has specialized in providing custom curtainwall systems both in the Midwest and nationally. From design concept to completion, the company offers offer engineering and design solutions, project management, performance testing and custom manufacturing for systems of all types.

13. Seele Inc.
New York, N.Y.
2011 annual sales: $32.4 million
President/CEO: Attila Arian
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 38
Years in business: 10
http://www.seele.com
Backlog change: increased by more than 100 percent (see the Turnaround: Number 13 Sees 100 Percent Increase in Backlog paragraph below)
Seele Inc. is a high-end glazing and curtainwall contractor that specializes in all-glass structures, customized curtainwall, membrane roofs and lightweight ETFE/PTFE building skins.

14. Champion Metal & Glass Inc.
Deer Park, N.Y.
2011 annual sales: $26.5 million
President/CEO: Ali Ghahremani
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 54
Years in business: 19
http://www.championmetalglass.com
Backlog change: +25 percent
Champion Metal and Glass Inc. works with major private developers, construction managers and general contractors, and has completed projects in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

15. Best Contracting Services Inc. (tie)
Gardena, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $23 million
President/CEO: Moji Taba (president), Sean Tabazadeh (CEO)
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 500
Years in business: 30
http://www.bestcontracting.com
BEST Contracting Services is a large specialty contractor that provides construction services for the entire building envelope. The company serves commercial, institutional and industrial building owners in both the private and public market sectors.

15. Progress Glass (tie)
San Francisco, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $23 million
President/CEO: Tom Burkard
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 105
Years in business: 65
http://www.progressglass.com
Backlog change: increased
Progress Glass has two locations, one in San Francisco and one in Cotati, Calif. The company services the whole San Francisco Bay area with union glaziers.

16. Karas & Karas Glass Co. Inc.
Boston, Mass.
2011 annual sales: $21.7 million
President/CEO: Joe Karas
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 91
Years in business: 88
http://www.karasglass.com
Karas & Karas Glass Co. Inc. is a full-service glazing contractor that provides a variety of services, including engineering, fabrication and installation.

17. Gamma USA Inc.
Miami, Fla.
2011 annual sales: $21.1 million
President/CEO: Matthew Baum
Number of employees: 175
Years in business: 17
http://www.gammaindustries.ca
Gamma Industries develops, manufactures and installs architectural aluminum products for both the commercial and institutional sectors, including fixed and operable windows, curtainwall, doors, panels, coverings and cladding.

18. Ridgeview Glass Inc. (tie)
Upper Marlboro, Md.
2011 annual sales: $20 million
President/CEO: Andrew Canter Jr.
Number of locations: 3
Number of employees: 85
Years in business: 30
http://www.ridgeviewglass.com
Backlog change: +10 percent
RGI is a commercial curtainwall contractor specified in custom or manufactured standard systems.

18. Heinaman Contract Glazing (tie)
Lake Forest, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $20 million
President/CEO: John Heinaman (chairman/CEO), Tom Howhannesian (president)
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 90
Years in business: 24
http://www.heinaman.net
Backlog change: slight decrease
Heinaman Contract Glazing provides high-quality curtainwall glazing, unitized glazing, aluminum panel systems, doors, windows, and various architectural aluminum and glass products.

19. Ajay Glass & Mirror Co. Inc.
Canandaigua, N.Y.
2011 annual sales: $18.9 million
President/CEO: George Stathopoulos (chair), Demetrios Stathopoulos (CEO), Steve Stathopoulos (president and COO), Dean Stathopoulos (executive vice president)
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 130
Years in business: 56
http://www.ajayglass.com
Ajay Glass designs, fabricates and installs custom or standard exterior wall systems that meets its customers’ specifications. The company also provides architects, contractors and owners with budgeting, design assistance, material sourcing/selection assistance and planning/scheduling.

20. Giroux Glass Inc.
Los Angeles, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $18.2 million
President/CEO: Anne-Merelie Murrell (CEO), Robert Burkhammer (president)
Number of locations: 4
Number of employees: 132
Years in business: 66
http://www.girouxglass.com
Backlog change: -23 percent
Giroux Glass Inc., an employee-owned glass, glazing and architectural metals contracting company, operates branches in Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Las Vegas and Fresno. The company caters to the glazing needs of the commercial, retail, and design residential sectors.

21. Metropolitan Glass Inc.
Denver, Colo.
2011 annual sales: $16.2 million
President/CEO: Michael Smith
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 50
Years in business: 48
http://www.metroglass.com
Backlog change: +12 percent
Metropolitan Glass specializes in furnishing and installing products in complex projects that involve high engineering standards, demanding specifications and sophisticated products.

22. Haley-Greer Inc.
Dallas, Texas
2011 annual sales: $16.1 million
President/CEO: Don Haley (CEO), Letitia Barker (president)
Number of employees: 150
Years in business: 33
http://www.haleygreer.com
Haley-Greer Inc. was founded in 1979 by Don Haley and Jim Greer. Haley-Greer’s market area currently is concentrated in the state of Texas although the company has completed several projects throughout the United States located in Washington, D.C., Louisiana, Virginia, North Carolina, California and Maryland.

23. Cherry Hill Glass Co. Inc.
Branford, Conn.
2011 annual sales: $16 million
President/CEO: Kevin O’Neill
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 75
Years in business: 20
http://www.cherryhillglass.com
Backlog change: +5 percent
Cherry Hill Glass Co. Inc. is a Branford, Conn.-based commercial glazing contractor/fabricator for all types of window and curtainwall systems. The company fabricates unitized and stick systems. Its skylight systems are fully tested and can be customized to suit any project.

24. R & R Window Contractors Inc.
Easthampton, Mass.
2011 annual sales: $15.9 million
President/CEO: Roger Fuller
Number of employees: 80
Years in business: 34
http://www.rrwindow.com
R & R Window Contractors Inc. is a 34-year-old full-service building envelope contractor, serving all of New England and eastern New York.

25. LCG Facades
Salt Lake City, Utah
2011 annual sales: $15 million
President/CEO: Gary Dabb
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 100
Years in business: 7
http://www.lcgfacades.com
Backlog change: +3 percent
Our focus is on providing exterior cladding solutions for buildings of all types. We are founded on the principle that innovation through partnerships is the best way to construct. We work with owners, architects and contractors to help achieve an enclosure solution that not only meets their goals in terms of design, but also cost and schedule as well.

26. Alexander Metals Inc.
Nashville, Tenn.
2011 annual sales: $13 million
President/CEO: Alec Estes
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 75
Years in business: 20
http://www.alexandermetalsinc.com
Alexander Metals is a 20-year-old com

pany in Nashville, Tenn., that specializes in promotion, sales, fabrication and installation of building envelope products.

27. Nelson Glass Co. Inc.
Birmingham, Ala.
2011 annual sales: $11.4 million
President/CEO: Fred Nelson (CEO)/Frank Dickinson (president)
Number of employees: 73
Years in business: 48
http://www.nelsonglass.com
Founded in 1966, Nelson Glass provides a wide range of products, including contract glazing and custom shower enclosures.

28. Minneapolis Glass Co.
Plymouth, Minn.
2011 annual sales: $13.5 million
President/CEO: Jennifer Lang
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 60
Years in business: 75
http://www.minneapolisglass.com
Minneapolis Glass Company is a regional architectural glass fabricator, distributor and glazing contractor that offers a variety of services, including mirrors, framed and frameless shower doors, aluminum storefront, insulating and tempered glass, shelving and table tops, and commercial and residential installation.

29. Benson Ltd.
Portland, Ore.
2011 annual sales: $11.0 million
President/CEO: Lou Niles
Number of employees: 100
Years in business: 21
http://www.bensonglobal.com
Benson Industries provides design, engineering, supply and installation of curtainwall and external cladding.

30. Crawford Tracey Corp.
Deerfield Beach, Fla.
2011 annual sales: $9.6 million
President/CEO: Raymond Crawford
Number of locations: 2
Number of employees: 65
Years in business: 55
http://www.crawfordtracey.com
Backlog change: +5 percent
Founded in 1956, Crawford Tracey Corp. manufactures and installs custom and conventional glazing systems.

31. Modern Mirror and Glass Co. Inc.
Roseville, Mich.
2011 annual sales: $9.2 million
President/CEO: Paula Zeoli
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 50
Years in business: 67
http://www.modernglass.net
Modern Mirror and Glass Co. Inc. specializes in buildings ranging from storefronts to large, custom curtainwall projects.

32. Mesa Contract Glazing Inc.
La Mesa, Calif.
2011 annual sales: $8.5 million
President/CEO: Donne Witte
Number of employees: 47
Years in business: 32
http://www.sunsetglazing.com
Mesa Contract Glazing Inc. was founded in 1980 and today provides single-source responsibility for the complete design and development of a project.

33. Sound Glass Sales Inc.
Tacoma, Wash.
2011 annual sales: $7.3 million
President/CEO: Warren Willoughby (owner/president)
Number of locations: 3
Number of employees: 42
Years in business: 29
http://www.soundglass.com
Sound Glass was founded in 1983 as a full-service glass shop in Lakewood, Wash. Today, the company has expanded to a large company that offers both commercial and residential services.

34. Juba Aluminum Products Co. Inc.
Concord, N.C.
2011 annual sales: $5 million
President/CEO: John Juba (CEO), Janna J. Riley (president)
Number of locations: 1
Number of employees: 66
Years in business: 18
http://www.jubaproducts.com
Backlog change: 50 percent decrease
Juba Aluminum Products constructs high-performance glazed curtainwall and storefronts for new commercial buildings and re-cladding projects.


Good Vibrations: What Contract Glaziers Are Optimistic About in 2012

As USGlass compiled this year’s list of the nation’s top contract glaziers, we also asked contract glaziers to provide some insight into what they’re optimistic about for the year ahead. Read on for a sampling of the answers from several leading contract glaziers.

“Companies will start hiring and need office space for their employees.”
—W & W Glass, Nanuet, N.Y.

“Margins increasing.”
—Massey’s Plate Glass and Aluminum, Branford, Conn.

“The start of private work in our backlog.”
—TSI/Exterior Wall Systems, Upper Marlboro, Md.

“A renewed and energized economy.”
—Heinaman Contract Glazing, Lake Forest, Calif.

“The U.S. dollar/exchange rate favors European
contractors in the United States.”
—Seele Inc., New York, N.Y.

“Continuing to collaborate with contractors, unions and vendors as a team to ensure products do not suffer loss of revenue and quality as we continue to emerge out of this tough economy.”
—Champion Metal and Glass, Deere Park, N.Y.

“For us, it is looking good—the backlog is growing.”
—Progress Glass, San Francisco, Calif.

“The most challenging of financial times are behind us.”
—Giroux Glass, Los Angeles

“The small spike in local construction projects.”
—Ridgeview Glass, Upper Marlboro, Md.

“Contract work should increase this year.”
—Cherry Hill Glass Co. Inc., Branford, Conn.

“We are backlogged for 2012.”
—LCG Facades, Salt Lake City

“Continued gradual recovery.”
—Modern Mirror Glass Co. Inc., Roseville, Mich.

“Currently, we will do a minimum of $15 million in sales in 2012; we are encouraged to see more negotiated and private work opportunities in spite of a crippled economy.”
—Juba Aluminum Products Inc., Concord, N.C.

“Increase in construction spending.”
—Metropolitan Glass, Denver, Colo.

 


The Down Side: Contract The Down Side: Contract Glaziers Share Their Fears for 2012

Despite a good bit of optimism as we look toward a recovering commercial market, contract glazing industry executives admit they still have some concerns for the months ahead. Read on to learn about their top areas of worry.

“Continued inaction in Washington, D.C.”
—W & W Glass, Nanuet, N.Y.

“Competition cutting prices.”
—Massey’s Plate Glass and Aluminum, Branford, Conn.

“The slow rebound of the commercial office building market.”
—TSI/Exterior Wall Systems, Upper Marlboro, Md.

“Banks being slow for lending to developers and
the construction industry in general.”
—Heinaman Contract Glazing, Lake Forest, Calif.

“State of the economy, high level of sovereign debt.”
—Seele Inc., New York, N.Y.

“Commercial instruction will continue to dip due to an uneven recovery and the absence of strong economic indicators.”
—Champion Metal and Glass, Deere Park, N.Y.

“That the rest of the country can get it
going just like the [San Francisco] Bay area.”
—Progress Glass, San Francisco, Calif.

“The availability of substantially sized jobs.”
—Giroux Glass, Los Angeles

“The economy—just like the last three years.”
—Ridgeview Glass, Upper Marlboro, Md.

“Rising material costs, vendor failures.”
—Cherry Hill Glass Co. Inc., Branford, Conn.

“The amount of work is still very small and almost all government-funded, still very little private funding.”
—LCG Facades, Salt Lake City

“Not reaching volume goals.”
—Modern Mirror Glass Co. Inc., Roseville, Mich.

“General election; we need a major overhaul
within our current political system.”
—Juba Aluminum Products Inc., Concord, N.C.

“Lack of larger projects.”
—Metropolitan Glass, Denver, Col

Get Listed!
Not on this year’s list, but think you should be? To make sure you’re included in the future, contact Penny Stacey at 540/720-5584, ext. 148 or email pstacey@glass.com, subject: Top Glazing Contractors.


Rewind: A Look at the Lists of the Past

USGlass magazine has compiled its list of the top contract glaziers for nearly a decade, from the construction boom a few years ago through the last few, more challenging years. Looking back, the list has seen some major changes, yet some items that have remained consistent throughout the years.

Among the biggest changes are the players absent from this year’s list. ASI Limited, based in Indianapolis, suspended operations last December, and now reportedly is back in business, but with new financial backing. The company was ranked number 6 last year on the USGlass list of top glazing contractors (see March 2011 USGlass, page 30) with $65.2 million in sales.

Even as USGlass compiled this year’s list, James Vogelsberg of American Glass and Metals in Plymouth, Mich., advised USGlass staff that his company is no longer conducting business; just five years ago, the company ranked number 14 with $21.5 million in sales (see March 2007 USGlass, page 58).

Last year, Trainor Glass Co. ranked top of the list—at $173 million in sales for 2010, and in 2011 saw a 36.4 percent drop to $110 million. Less than one week after submitting its 2011 financial results, the company closed its doors (see related story on page 10).

Likewise, Harmon Inc., number 2 on last year’s list, has moved to the number 5 spot—down to $98.1 million in sales from $150 million in 2010, a 34.6 percent decrease.

Still, contract glazing company officials are optimistic about the year ahead—and some already predict an upswing for this year. See the Rewind: A Look at the Lists of the Past paragraph below for a look at the optimism seen across the industry from its top contract glaziers.


Turnaround: Number 13 Sees 100 Percent Increase in Backlog

“During a turnaround, a lot of people make the mistake of just taking jobs to stay busy,” says Attila Arian, president of New York-based Seele Inc. “We’ve seen that a lot in the industry, where people take jobs even if they’re not covering their overhead, just to stay busy.”

Seele, however, has taken a different approach—leading to what company officials are calling more than a 100-percent increase in its backlog for 2011 (when compared with 2010). Arian says the company took particular care with its focus when the downturn struck.

“During the downturn, we focused on our value proposition and attempted to realign ourselves more with it,” says Arian. “ … We focus on those jobs where we can create value with all those things we have—such as strong engineering and innovation.”

Based on this commitment, the company bid on fewer jobs in 2011—and instead focused on the jobs in which Seele officials felt they could excel. “Those jobs we really pursued were the ones we were passionate about to the end,” says Arian.

And that passion also helps to gain jobs, he adds: “When you’re sitting in a room with your clients, they can see how passionate you are. A lot of people go into negotiations knowing that they really need the job and they don’t necessarily show themselves from their strong points.”

Aside from the changes Seele has made internally, company officials also admit the second half of 2011 proved optimistic in the contract glazing arena. “We could clearly see an increase in the projects that were demanding our services, that were really calling for us and were really calling for the type of service we provide,” says Arian.

Arian offers the following advice for others hoping to achieve similar growth. “The best advice I can give fellow contractors is to really make sure that you understand who you are and what it is that you do best,” he says.


Institutional, Federal Work Less Reliable for Glazing Contractors Seeking a Niche

Glazing contractors across the United States continue to scout out markets that might provide new opportunities during a time otherwise marked by low construction starts.

In 2011, the education sector marked one such niche still seeing new construction. In 2012, work in that sector is less certain.

“We see a ‘typical-seasonal’ amount of K-12 school bidding right now,” comments Linda Vos-Graham, president of glazing contractor Vos Glass Inc. in Grand Rapids, Mich. “Many public schools are preparing for summer renovations and additions. New construction is very limited,” she adds.

“[Construction has] been ongoing for public schools,” says George Petzen, estimator with LinEl Signature in Mooresville, Ind., of school construction. “At least for renovation work [the schedule is to] break in the spring and rush so you get to the jobsite by summer break and have everything finished up by the time they come back to school in the fall. Some things never change.”

Vos-Graham finds that cost today is driving bid selection for many public schools.

“There is an occasional design consideration for increase energy performance, but cost is dictating the basics most often on K-12,” she says. “Some exceptions are on P-3 [public-private] contracts and university projects that have hefty donors that require non-typical considerations for energy performance,” she adds.

In some regions, higher education campuses are providing meatier work for glazing contractors.

“[There’s] a lot of university work right now,” Petzen finds. LinEl currently is finishing a big project at Cornell in New York City. Petzen says that the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast seem to have more of these projects than other areas although, he adds, “In the Midwest we just finished a project for the University of Chicago.”

Like Vos-Graham, Petzen adds that these university projects are often “meatier” in their performance requirements, as well.

“I think typically what sets things for schools apart are that they’re invariably LEED associated projects,” Petzen says. “Not so much with K-12, but for university work we see an architectural level of expertise and cutting edge stuff that … is sometimes pushing the envelope.”

Vos Glass, which focuses on work in Michigan, finds, “University work is sporadic.” According to Vos-Graham, “Public universities and college construction is down from previous years, but there are rumors of new projects being considered after the election.”

Victor Cornellier, president of TSI/ Exterior Wall Systems in Landover, Md., sees some movement in the Mid-Atlantic for higher education projects, but notes that may be the result of another market segment that remains strong.
“Here you’ve got several major universities but there doesn’t seem to be much going on, except for George Washington University, which has got two major technology buildings that are getting ready to come out of the ground,” Cornellier says. “Locally, we see the University of Maryland Medical Systems continues to [grow], they have expansion plans—but that falls under health care,” he says. He continues, “There still seems to be quite a bit of work going on in the health care industry and various medical centers around the country. Here we’ve got Baltimore and John Hopkins and what’s going on in those areas is building replacement hospitals and so forth. That seems to be happening in other parts of the country as well,” Cornellier says.

Petzen notes that the company has continued to glaze quite a few institutional projects, and that the source may be another area that stimulated work in 2011: federal funding.

“We’re doing a lot of museum work still, some private, some public,” Petzen says. “Funding for institutional projects, I suspect, probably [has] some federal dollars in a lot of it, but by the time it gets to [us] we’re not necessarily aware of it,” he adds.

Cornellier agrees that the days of working off of federal funding are limited indeed. “I think federal projects pretty much nationwide are cut way back first of all because of budget cuts,” he says. “And I think that the shovel-ready definition of projects and the BRAC [base realignment and closure] work which hit our region pretty well—Texas got a lot of BRAC work, San Diego got a lot of it, of course Washington, D.C., and Virginia—those projects are finishing up and there is nothing new replacing them.”

—Megan Headley

 

 

 


 

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