Volume 6, Issue 5, September - October 2002

More War Stories
by Leslie Shaver

Stolen Cars
Like most auto team leaders, John Marshall of Brian’s Window Tinting in Hollywood, Fla., usually receives requests for illegal tinting. But one request that sticks in his mind was for legal tinting.

A customer brought in his car to get his windows retinted. The vehicle had been stolen and, when it was retrieved, the windows had been tinted with a dark limo film.  

And how was the car retrieved? The illegal film on the car. The police originally pulled it over because of illegal tint. Needless to say, they immediately arrested the perpetrators.

Yet more proof that crime—and illegal tinting—does not pay.

Oops!
 While many of the stories recited for this story were humorous, none were very costly—except for what happened to Jim Smith of A-1 Doctor Tint in Carson, Calif. Smith was just starting out in the commercial/residential end of the business when he got a dream job to put 22 skylights in a custom home.

While Smith knew that he “had to be careful with skylights,” he apparently did not take this warning seriously enough.

“We were dummies in the beginning,” he said.

Instead of putting the required proper film over the skylights, Smith's company applied regular limo film. The results were predictable. The skylights blew up and had to replaced. Only the process was even a bit more complicated than that. To properly get to them parts of the roof had to removed.

Fortunately, Smith did have insurance.

Ever had anything crazy ever happen to you? Did you make a mistake that you will never forget? Did an employee do something so stupid that you will never forget? Ever had a customer so difficult that you just can’t get it out of your mind? If any of these things ever happened to you, please drop us an email at WindowFilm@glass.com. We may use your story the next time we look at this side of the film industry.

 


WINDOW FILM

© Copyright 2002 Key Communications Inc. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any type without expressed written permission.