Volume 6, Issue 5, September - October 2002

Noteworthy 

New Products and Services                                                

FILM
Solar Films Galore
Solar Film of Richmond, Va., has introduced a window film designed to reduce fading and heat inside a room and to make glass hard to penetrate and shatter-resistant.

“The object is to do this without appearing reflective,” said Solar Film president Tom Parker. “You want this to look like natural glass.”

According to Solar Film, its products cut the amount of ultraviolet and visual light rays that enter homes and businesses, thus reducing the rate at which furniture, drapes and curtains fade for your customers. The films also reduce the amount of heat that enters a room, cutting cooling costs for home and car owners, according to the company, and, in the winter it reduces the amount of heat lost through windows.

In addition, the film can also serve as an extra security layer, according to Solar Film.

FILM
CPFilms and DuPont Teijin Form Alliance
CPFilms and DuPont Teijin Films have announced the formation of a new strategic relationship to work jointly to reduce injury and property damage due to flying glass. This relationship includes joint development and marketing of protective window film products for the commercial and residential building markets.

Mylar polyester, a product of DuPont Teijin Films, will be exclusively used as a component of the Llumar and Vista line of safety and security films sold under the Magnum and Mirage brand names. Mylar possesses optimal properties for safety and security window film: physical strength to control shattering glass and optical properties for visual clarity.

Llumar Magnum safety window film is applied in U.S. embassies, military bases, other government buildings and commercial facilities throughout the world, providing increased security and protection to employees and others. The new collaboration will expedite and extend marketing and development of Llumar Magnum safety and security films made with Mylar to enhance the performance of glass in the buildings market.

“The alliance between our companies will quickly strengthen technology and expertise to create a broader offering to commercial and residential markets,” said Ken Vickers, president and corporate executive officer of CPFilms. “New products will continue to help control—and in some cases prevent—damage and injuries through expanded application of well designed safety and security window films.”

COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS
Digital Glass Decoration
T2 Solutions and IIMAK have teamed up with Matan Digital Printers and Lintec to develop two new ways to decorate glass. Through one method users can either print directly on Lintec’s WINCOS window film with process colors, spot colors or satin-etch custom color, which the company says offers the look of sandblasted glass. Clear films are available with three adhesives—low-tack, medium-tack or permanent—as well as iridescent films in a variety of colors. 
Through the second method, the company says users can imitate the look of sandblasted patterns. Through the system, users can print frit-based inks digitally onto special decal paper, which can be applied to glass. According to the company, the glass is then fired at 1,150 degrees Fahrenheit, making the image permanent.

MARKETING 
FTI Offers Dealers Help
Film Technologies International of St. Petersburg, Fla., has introduced new SUN-GARD automotive window film marketing materials. The new program consists of a SUN-GARD dealer tri-fold, consumer tri-fold, window film sample cards, point-of-purchase display, wallboards, banner, t-shirts and a yellow-pages advertising manual.

“This new program is really fun. It highlights our automotive posters and plays on the words ‘film star,’” said Steve Michaud, executive vice president for the company. “The literature and accessories are pieces any dealers should be happy to hang in their shops. Our distributors and their sales’ staffs will have wallboards and point-of-purchase displays up all over the continent before next season begins.” 


WINDOW FILM

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