• Field Notes 20.11.2013

    When I first met Greg Carney in ’81, he and I were both brand-new to the glazing business.  I was a draftsman for Olden & Co in Dallas. He was with LOF Sales, helping Steve Ingram in the Dallas market.

    As so many of us were, I was shocked and saddened to read last week that Greg had passed.  Later, when reading some of the tributes to him, I had to laugh at one of the remarks about him walking job sites. I think I was with him on that first walk that was mentioned.  He wouldn’t let me live down what I did on site that day.

    The job was the Commerce Bank Tower in Ft. Worth — 40 stories with lockstrip neoprene curtain wall on an aluminum frame.  You have to remember, this was before the required use of full body harnesses and perimeter safety lines.  Our glazing crew was setting glass on the 38th floor.  So, Greg and I watched for a while from the floor, then went up to the roof to get a bird’s-eye view of the crew running the lockstrip and setting the glass, nudging the glass past the stubborn gasket corners.

    Instead of leaning out over the edge of the 40th floor roof, I laid flat, chest down, and snuck my head over the edge (no fool I).  Greg just walked up to the edge, grabbed the aluminum curtainwall frame and leaned out over it.  Good for him.  I wasn’t going to do it.  He never let me forget it.

    A few years ago when I was at another company, I walked by the conference room, and some of our folks were talking to a guy that looked an awfully lot like Greg.  He looked up, saw me, and shined that grin that you just knew could only be Greg’s.  And while he didn’t interrupt the meeting to come grab me, he did so later.  Even though we hadn’t seen each other in years, it was like we hadn’t missed a day.  He allowed you to think that once you were his friend, you were always going to be.

    I crossed paths with him many times in recent years, and worked under his direction when the Sealant Manual was revised, putting together the GANA Blueprint Reading course.

    It’s not an understatement to say I have a lot a respect for him.  There have not been many people who have contributed more to making this a better industry than Greg.  And, I for one (I’m sure there are many) will miss his infectious personality and the contributions he would have continued to make to this industry.  Irreplaceable doesn’t begin to describe him.

    Fare thee well; you did good, Greg.  Thank you.  We will miss you.  What will always bring a smile to my face whenever your name comes up is that smile and that laugh!

    Posted by Blogger @ 2:19 pm

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