Annual Conference Day Two: Defining Jumbo Glass

In today’s laminating division meeting, Julia Schimmelpenningh with Eastman Chemical leads a discussion on whether there’s a need to define jumbo sized glass.

Does jumbo glass need a definition? That was the topic debated today during the Laminating Division meeting during the 2018 Annual Conference in Napa, CA. Julia Schimmelpenningh with Eastman Chemical chairs the laminating technical committee and raised a discussion that addressed trying to define jumbo laminated glass and also developing a draft outline of what to include in a potential glass informational bulletin.

As part of some earlier discussions, Schimmelpenningh pointed out that ASTM C 1172 addresses such glass as being greater than 75 square feet. She asked whether this size is sufficient or does it need to be greater, perhaps 100 square feet? Or does jumbo glass need to be defined at all.

Speaking of the work being done within the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance, Margaret Webb said that for insulating glass they’ve defined jumbo as anything greater than 50 square feet.

During the meeting, the group discussed a number of considerations involved in trying to define what constitutes jumbo glass. For example, what changes will need to be made to ASTM C 1172 to accommodate jumbo glass? Schimmelpenningh said they can do a survey to gather information about this, and reminded those in attendance that the survey would not be just for jumbo glass, but the standard as a whole.

Schimmelpenningh also pointed out that meeting a standard such as ANSI Z97 would not be in the scope of any jumbo glass task group in the future because currently recommendations can’t yet be made since testing information hasn’t been done. She said they are discussing potential research/efforts with the Safety Glazing Certification Council.

Another consideration, she said, is that ASTM C 1036, which could be a starting place for definitions, and the max bow/warp table in C 1048, will need to be updated for consistency. She said those are currently outside the task of this group under the laminating division, but will come into play under the new GANA-NGA organization.

Some of the attendees questioned why there’s even a need at all to define jumbo-sized glass. Webb said special considerations are necessary for these extremely large units, and it’s important to pay careful attention to what you’re doing when working with this type of glass.

Another attendee added that many of these considerations revolve around logistics, and pointed out that architects don’t understand what a fabricator has to go through to get the glazing unit to the jobsite. The group also discussed the possibility that the real consideration is to define the issues, rather than the size.

During the meeting attendees also agreed it’s important to not duplicate this work in other areas, such as insulating and tempering, and said the document should be something that addresses special considerations for large and heavy glass, which would cover all segments in one document.

Schimmelpenningh said that based on discussions, there seemed to be a need to develop an informational bulletin to help raise awareness about special issues related to large and heavy glass. She said the intent would be to make it very general to raise awareness about the issues that people need to think about. These could include safety, quality characteristics, handling and storage, among others. A group was formed that will continue to review and discuss development of this document.

The Annual Conference continues through tomorrow. Stay tuned to USGNN.com™ for more news and reports from Napa.

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