The study’s primary objective was to use finite element models to evaluate the failure response of laminated glass panels under blast loads.

A team of engineers has detailed a model-based simulation approach to predicting the brittle failure response of glass in blast-resistant laminated windows. Hani Salim, a University of Missouri civil and environmental engineering professor, and his team created a simulation approach that integrates detailed modeling with a relation considering both elasticity and damage.

The study’s primary objective was to use finite element models to evaluate the failure response of laminated glass panels under blast loads. In a Missouri College of Engineering release, Salim explained that the goal is to improve predictive tools for better designs. He said it’s tough to determine where glass will fail under pressure.

“We need to understand how glass breaks, how fragments propagate cracks, and how it responds to failure,” said Salim. “…The idea is to improve upon existing codes and refine predictions using a different damage model type.”

The researchers’ simulation method is unique because it differs from the criteria used to predict material failure. The team used the Rankine failure criterion, which predicts failure in a material exhibiting brittleness. They validated their model’s accuracy by conducting simulations and comparing the results with tests using a shock tube.

“This paper reveals the limitations of existing codes, such as Abaqus or ANSYS, where the failure criterion is typically formulated using the von Mises elastoplasticity criterion in modeling glass failure,” said Salim. “We developed an elasto-damage glass model subroutine based on the Rankine failure criterion for predicting brittle failure in the glass layers of laminated glass panels. This approach offers a robust tool to accurately evaluate and enhance the safety of blast-resistant laminated glass windows.”

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