Tyson Oldroyd, project manager at Kimzey Software, talks to GlassBuild attendees about Glasstrax, an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software program for glass businesses.
Tyson Oldroyd, project manager at Kimzey Software, talks to GlassBuild attendees about Glasstrax, an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software program for glass businesses.

As part of the construction community, the fenestration industry utilizes plenty of hardware. Software, however, has also staked its claim.

Among the more than 330 industry suppliers exhibiting at GlassBuild America 2014 in Las Vegas are a handful of software companies that specialize in helping businesses streamline their operations, cut costs and stay organized.

“Our industry is extremely competitive with glaziers that are forward-thinking,” says Building Envelope Software Technologies (BEST) general manager of sales Josh Rudd. “When looking about their business five years out, ten years out and so on, software is basically a requirement.”

BEST offers various software products, including LogiKal, a program that helps glaziers quickly estimate projects and submit bids, and PrefSuite, an enterprise resource program (ERP) for manufacturers.

The company also provides an Apple app for storefront installers that helps its efforts in “trying to bridge the gap from the field to the shop,” says BEST operations manager William Downing.

“Our software can now export all the elevations out to the iPad app, and in the field, the glazier can then take measurements, apply it to the window, then just connect to Wi-Fi or their phone and send it right back to the shop where they can fabricate the glass,” he says. “They can send pictures from the field straight into the office and they’ll all be assigned to that elevation or to that project.”

Kimzey Software is another company that offers an ERP solution for glass businesses—GlassTrax.

“GlassTrax does everything from order entry, quotes, to accounting and production,” says Kimzey sales and project manager Tyson Oldroyd. “You can schedule your jobs out and see everything that’s out on your floor.”

Oldroyd says GlassTrax’s barcode scanning capability has been popular of late.

“People are liking the barcode scanning lately because they can know exactly where each piece of glass is on their shop floor,” he says. “They’ll be able to tell what the bottlenecks are, what their inefficiencies are, which employee is better working the table as opposed to the insulated unit department—things like that. So it’s becoming a big sell for us, and it’s very simple and easy to use.”

Also exhibiting is GTS, which offers auto glass and flat glass software solutions. GTS has ramped up its flat glass side due to industry demand.

“Flat glass has been in our products segment for close to 15 years,” says GTS strategic account manager Kimberly Caldwell. “It’s just been more heavily focused on lately, because the industry is now driving toward needing software more than it did 10 years ago.”

Among the demand trends, Caldwell says there has been a heavy push on inventory control.