At the heart of the station, the escalators and glass elevator pass through a 55-foot high underground central chamber, one of the highest interior volumes in the city. LMN Architects and artist Leo Saul Berk collaborated to create an integrated experience for travelers. Photo by Kevin Scott

The Sound Transit University of Washington Station has received a 2018 National Honor Award for Interior Architecture from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The UW Station is one of only five projects to be recognized for interior architecture this year by the program which “celebrates the most innovative and spectacular interior spaces from across the globe.”

“We are greatly honored by this recognition. Our design goal for the station was to integrate multi-modal transportation systems anchored by an inspiring public mixing zone that underscores the civic importance of rail transit to the campus community,” says Mark Reddington, partner at LMN, the architecture firm behind the project.

The 2-level glass entrance structure frames views of the surrounding context, including Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains. The glass structure also serves as a light well, allowing daylight to reach down to the mezzanine level. Photo by Kevin Scott.

The Sound Transit University of Washington Station adds multiple threads to the urban fabric. Knitting together transportation modalities from bike to bus to pedestrians to trains, the multi-disciplinary design approach creates a unified solution at a previously problematic street intersection, one of the busiest in Seattle, and provides a unique gateway to the UW campus through its above and below-grade experiences.

The two-level glass entrance structure frames views of the surrounding context, including Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains. The glass structure also serves as a light well, allowing daylight to reach down to the mezzanine level. Between the surface and the train platform 100 feet below, circulation paths and visual connections between multiple levels orient users to the station’s overall volume, structure and internal flow.

At the heart of the station, the escalators and glass elevator pass through a 55-foot high underground central chamber, one of the highest interior volumes in the city. LMN Architects and artist Leo Saul Berk collaborated to create an integrated experience for travelers, where the architecture seamlessly merges with Berk’s artwork, Subterraneum, which expresses the geological layers of soil surrounding the station walls.

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