Trends come and go. Some turn into industry mainstays, such as automation and connectivity, while others have crashed and burned. However, there are several business trends that glass and glazing companies need to keep an eye out for as 2023 winds down.

This includes the continued meshing of digital technologies to ease the pain of menial and time-consuming tasks. Software companies have already programmed applications that enhance organization and streamline billing, while glass companies are designing tools that can turn buildings into digital organisms that monitor and respond to the environment in real time.

Glass and glazing companies need to move past the question of whether they should adopt technology in the first place and instead question what the right technologies for each area of operations are.

To best prepare for these “intelligent enterprises,” as Forbes calls it, glass and glazing companies need to move past the question of whether they should adopt technology in the first place and instead question what the right technologies for each area of operations are.

Bernard Marr, a Forbes contributor, says it best, “At this point, there is really very little excuse for being in business and not understanding how artificial intelligence and the other technologies mentioned above will impact your business and industry.”

Glass companies also need to consider immersion. Yes, showrooms are an effective way to allow customers to get hands-on experience with products and serve as a hub of ideas, and conferences are ideal for expanding business relationships; however, those are limited by geography and time.

Technology can enhance those processes. Virtual reality (VR) is breathing down our necks. Though VR remains niche and can look downright ridiculous at times, looking at you, Meta, the possibilities to showcase glass products in an interactive environment with customers across the globe are immense. If you play video games, you’ll understand how graphically impressive virtual reality will eventually become.

Think of digital buildings with dynamic glass installed that can be adjusted according to a virtual sun while the customers are in the room watching everything virtually in first person. Maybe you throw that customer and building in the middle of a hurricane to simulate the strength of impact glass firsthand. Heck, why not an earthquake to show off the resilience of the facade? Or maybe show how equipment lines increase productivity through visual representations instead of brochures?

The possibilities are endless with technology. As we have experienced throughout the past decade, things are changing fast.

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